Two men – one from Laramie, the other from Colorado – convicted of drug crimes were each sentenced to a term of supervised probation Tuesday in Albany County District Court.

Dusty Lee Haviland, 30, of Laramie was sentenced to four years of supervised probation in lieu of a three- to five-year suspended prison sentence after pleading guilty in December to one felony count of possession of a controlled substance marijuana.

Court documents say Haviland was participating in an interview with police regarding unrelated charges when he admitted to having marijuana in his vehicle and residence at the time of the interview.

A consensual search of Haviland’s vehicle turned up roughly 23 grams of marijuana as well as a brownie and beverage each containing tetrahydrocannabinol.

Haviland said in court Tuesday that he realized he was addicted to marijuana and voluntarily took random drug tests over the past seven months, adding that every test came back clean.

“Yeah, you do have an addiction,” said Judge Jeffrey Donnell. “I hope now you will deal with it accordingly and maybe now you at least recognize it for what it is.”

John Levi Harder, 32, of Colorado was sentenced to four years of supervised probation in lieu of a three- to five-year suspended prison sentence.

Donnell ordered Harder to pay a $1,000 fine and complete 100 hours of community service within the next 15 months after pleading guilty to one felony charge of possession of a controlled substance marijuana.

Court documents say Harder was arrested April 23 after an Albany County Sheriff’s Deputy pulled him over and discovered more than three ounces of marijuana in his car.

Harder – whose previous appearances before Donnell have been contentious – represented himself in court Tuesday and argued that he was a victim of racial discrimination.

“I didn’t know that being eighteen to thirty-five and being from Colorado was a race,” said Donnell. “You throw words around that you apparently have no idea what they mean.”

“You should apologize to the officers,” said Donnell.

As part of the plea deal, prosecutor Kurt Britzius recommended probation – citing Harder’s history of three misdemeanor convictions and evidence of a mental disorder that Harder was diagnosed with in 2006.

“I think we see a more humble Mr. Harder here today, and I think probation is appropriate,” said Britzius. “It will be up to him whether he lives up to the expectations of this court and his community.”

“You get your break today, Mr. Harder, and it’s a big one,” said Donnell. “Probation here isn’t hard – all you have to do is behave yourself.”