Trinidad, Colorado, recently made national headlines with the announcement of the world's first "marijuana mall". A group of developers are planning to open a strip mall near the Colorado - New Mexico border this spring, which would house five pot dispensaries under one roof.

Which begs the question, could a similar project be in the works for Colorado's northern border?

First, consider the history of Trinidad. Long considered a friendly haven for controversial businesses, the city already has the title of "Sex Change Capital of the World".

Second, consider Trinidad's location. Only 13 miles north of the New Mexico border, the proposed "marijuana mall" will likely attract more out-of-state customers than local business.

Trinidad also has the real estate inventory and infrastructure to support the new development.

While small northern Colorado border towns like Carr and Wellington could stand to benefit from the marijuana boom, potential developers would have to purchase or lease privately held land.

Nearby Fort Collins already hosts two recreational marijuana dispensaries. Would there be enough economic benefit for Larimer County to approve a larger marijuana mall in a rural area closer to the border? And would there be enough demand from Wyoming and Nebraska to support it?

Probably not. Which is why, when and if, a similar marijuana mall opens in Northern Colorado, it will probably be in the Fort Collins area.